Social Work (SW)

SW 202  Introduction to Social Work  (3)  

This course is an introduction to the knowledge and skills of the generalist practice of social work. It includes an examination of the history, principles, practice, research, and literature in the social welfare field. Theoretical and professional foundations, diverse client systems, areas of practice, contemporary social policies, and social work values are examined. The student is given opportunities to dialogue with community agency representatives.

SW 235  Human Behavior and the Social Environment I  (3)  

This course examines human behavior and the social environment using the generalist social work theoretical framework to explain the interactions of individuals, families, and groups. Special emphasis is given to the biological, social, psychological, and cultural factors that affect human behavior within these micro and mezzo systems.

SW 236  Human Behavior and the Social Environment II  (3)  

This course examines human behavior and the social environment using the generalist social work theoretical framework to explain the interactions of communities, organizations, and society. Special emphasis is given to the biological, social, psychological, cultural, and spiritual factors that affect human behavior within these macro systems. Pre or corequisite: SW 235.

SW 238  Introduction to Peace Studies: Peacebuilding and Conflict Resolution  (3)  

Peace Studies seeks to understand and address persistent conflict and violence in the world. Peace Studies integrates knowledge from the thought traditions of multiple disciplines. It engages in building understanding of how those involved in the violent conflict and those external to the violent conflict can build stable peace. This course is designed to provide a cross-disciplinary examination of violence and Peace Studies to develop a firm grounding in addressing violence of a direct physical and structural kind by policymakers, professional peacebuilders, and peace researchers. This leads us to focusing more on peace than on violence so that we deal with the patterns of violence assessed in global, national, and local environments.

SW 331  Social Work Practice I: Micro Methods: Individuals and Families  (3)  

The basic class in social work helping methods, this course applies the generalist approach to social work practice with individuals and families. Discussion of case studies with emphasis on systems theory and the ecological method. While this course focuses on micro level practice, the methods introduced are applicable to all types of social work practice. Prerequisite: social work major; pre or corequisite: SW 202 and SW 235.

SW 332  Social Work Practice II: Mezzo Methods: Small and Large Groups  (3)  

This focus of this course is the generalist approach to problem solving and inter­vention practices at the small and large group levels, introducing the function and role of the social worker in these settings. The class examines the dynamics that occur when clients with common concerns are brought together for the purpose of helping one another. Prerequisite: social work major and SW 202; pre or corequisite: SW 238.

SW 333  Social Work Practice III: Macro Methods: Communities, Organizations, and Societies  (3)  

This course introduces the function and role of the social worker in organizations, communities, and societies. While many of the processes used in micro, mezzo, and macro practice are similar, there are unique features involved in the macro context which are examined and illustrated. Organizational and community theories are linked to practice applications. Prerequisites: social work major and SW 202; pre or corequisite: SW 238.

SW 334  Social Welfare Policy and Service  (3)  

Development of social welfare policy and service in response to changing social conditions. Focuses on the theory, history, scope, nature, organization, and implementation of current programs on local, state, and federal levels and in the private sector. Prerequisite: social work major or permission of instructor.

SW 340  Working with Diverse Populations  (3)  

This course is designed to increase student knowledge of diversity in individuals, families, groups, communities, organizations, and societies. Addressing issues and exploring values necessary for successful interaction with diverse individuals, their families, and the communities and organizations with which they interact. Groups to be addressed include ethnic, racial, cultural, religious; socioeconomic/class distinctions; individuals with physical, mental and emotional challenges; women; older adults and youth; and sexual orientation. Designated theoretical frameworks that explain the interaction in the social systems of diverse individuals, families, groups, communities, organizations, and societies will be discussed. The course also focuses on the relationship between diversity issues and human behavior, including prejudice and discrimination. Specific frameworks will be explored to understand the relationship between diversity and cultural, historical, biological, social, psychological, and spiritual variables.

SW 341  Relationships, Intimacy and Sexuality Across the Lifespan  (3)  

This course is designed to increase student learning in relationships through a discussion of sexuality and intimacy. Students will address these topics through knowledge of the biological, social, spiritual, and psychological aspects of relationships, sexuality, and intimacy. Knowledge of and competence in understanding populations-at-risk who are experiencing issues with intimacy, sexuality, and relationships will be explored.

SW 342  Intercultural Leadership Development  (3)  

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop leadership skills using a community based learning model. Students will participate in leadership learning experiences in community social service organizations. Leadership skills will be increased through actively participating with community leaders involved in a wide variety of programs that target services for populations at risk and diverse groups.

SW 343  Living Fully, Dying Well: Exploring Loss, Grief and Death Across the Lifespan  (3)  

Loss, grief, and death are universal and inescapable aspects of the human experience. Loss occurs throughout life from minor daily occurrences to life changing events. Death is a primary loss, but other events in life are losses too; divorce, job loss, disaster, loss of security/safety as a victim of a crime and many others. These experiences are frequently complex and affect how one lives. We learn about loss, grief and death so that we can know better how to live. Personal awareness, experience, and attitudes about loss, grief, and death influence how social workers care for the bereaved and those at end of life. It is important that conscious and thoughtful study is given to these topics. This interdisciplinary course examines the biopsychosocial, spiritual, and cultural aspects of loss, grief, dying, and death within the context of historical and current grief and loss theory, human development, culture, and types of loss. Examples of losses examined include perinatal loss, death of a child, spouse, parent, friend, and others. The impact of how one dies, such as suicide, violent death, terminal illness and the impact on survivors is also examined. Practice models of coping with chronic and terminal illness are also considered.

SW 360  Health and Human Services Administration  (3)  

This course is a real world introduction to the administration of health and human service organizations. Learn how to effectively manage interdisciplinary, interdepartmental, and inter-organizational situations in and among health and human services organizations through real life and applicable learning techniques, such as case scenarios. Examine the principles and practices of health and human services administration including ethics and values, leadership styles, theories of health and human services administration, and policies related to the management of health and human services are examined. Diverse client systems and developing sensitivity and understanding of various cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic, and spiritual backgrounds of individuals and groups in health and human services are emphasized.

SW 361  Budgeting and Financial Management for Health and Human Services Administration  (3)  

This is an introductory module designed for students who have little or no background in budgeting and financial management. The focus of this course is on the budget process for health care and human service organizations. Participants are exposed to specific techniques of health care and human service organization budgeting and variance analysis. The objectives for this course are for participants to improve their understanding of the budget process as it applies to health care and human service organizations and to learn valuable specific techniques of budgeting and variance analysis. Students learn to create, execute and analyze the basic types of budgets used in public, non-profit, and for-profit organizations. The course will teach specific tools using the case method and exercises. The course covers budget analysis, budget formulation, budget execution, budget strategies, evaluation of operating and capital budgets, and cost accounting. Special emphasis is placed on gerontological health and human services financial management.

SW 362  Perspectives in Gerontology  (3)  

This course provides an overview of issues related to older adults and their families and constitutes a core course for the interdisciplinary course of study of gerontology at this College. It examines the nature of the aging process, the ways in which persons adapt to changes, and the ways in which the interventions/services may assist with these adaptations. Special emphasis is given to the ways in which physical, social, and psychological factors interact to impact how persons age. The needs and issues encountered by older persons both within the community and in institutional settings will be examined. Work with caregivers will be considered. Students will examine ways to work with individuals, families, and groups. The course includes material addressing special populations and ethical issues.

SW 363  Grant Writing for Health and Human Services Administration  (3)  

This is an introductory module designed for students who have little or no background in grant writing. The focus of this course is on the grant writing process for health care and human service organizations. Specific techniques of health care and human service organization grant writing are presented. The objectives for this course are for participants to improve their understanding of the grant writing process as it applies to health care and human service organizations and to learn valuable specific techniques of grant writing. Students learn to research, create, and analyze the grant writing process in health and human service organizations. Special emphasis is placed on gerontological health and human services grant writing.

SW 365  DSM-5 and Mental Health Issues Across the Lifespan  (3)  

This course will focus on the application of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DMS-5) for assessing and understanding mental health issues affecting human behavior across the lifespan with children, adolescents, adults, and families. Students will learn models of DSM-5 assessment to evaluate human functioning across the lifespan with emphasis on women and gender, vulnerable and diverse populations, and mezzo-macro issues.

SW 370  Family Violence and Sexual Abuse Issues  (3)  

This course introduces students to issues of family violence and sexual abuse across the lifespan. The different types of family violence and sexual abuse will be discussed, including domestic violence, global/international violence against women, rape, courtship violence and date rape, sexual assault, cultural issues related to abuse, bullying, school violence and abuse, child physical abuse, child sexual abuse, abuse against parents, elder abuse, sexual harassment, and abuse among vulnerable populations. Ethics and values, as well as criminal justice issues regarding family violence and sexual abuse, are emphasized. The history, policy, effects, and practice regarding family violence and sexual abuse will also be examined.

SW 379  Interviewing Methods  (3)  

A workshop course designed to assist students in learning interviewing techniques. Discussion and practical exercises will be used as well as video and audio facilities. Identification, observation, understanding, knowledge, demonstration, and student practicing of interviewing methods are utilized. Prerequisite: junior or senior status or permission of the instructor.

SW 390  Special Topics in Social Work  (3)  

A seminar focusing upon a selected area of interest in social work. Topics may include such areas as social stress, poverty, mental health, substance abuse, women in society, occupations and professions, conflict, peace studies, social psychiatry, criminal justice, homelessness, and veterans. May be repeated for credit with a different topic and the consent of the advisor. Prerequisite: SW 202 or permission of the instructor.

SW 397  Independent Study in Social Work  (1-3)  

Independent readings and seminar discussions in selected areas of interest. This course is not intended as a substitute for an existing course. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of six hours, only three of which apply to the hours required for the social work major. Prerequisites: Nine hours in SW, junior or senior status, and permission of the instructor and the Social Work program director.

SW 484  Social Work Research Methods and Statistical Concepts I  (3)  

Social Work Research Methods and Statistical Concepts I is designed to provide a foundation for research competencies and statistics in social work practice. The course focuses upon knowledge of qualitative and quantitative research methods, a significant component of practice knowledge. Practice and program effectiveness, imperative in social work practice, will be addressed. Students will learn to understand and apply social work research and basic statistical concepts in order to analyze the quality of research studies, to evaluate their own practice, and to conduct evidence-based research. SPSS is introduced. Ethical aspects of research are considered in terms of the values of the social work profession. Corequisite: SW 332 and SW 333.

SW 485  Social Work Research Methods and Statistical Concepts II  (3)  

Social Work Research Methods and Statistical Concepts II helps students achieve basic research methodology and statistics skills to achieve social work competence in research design, data collection, and data analysis. SPSS is applied. Students learn to analyze exemplary social work research and present research projects that build theoretical and methodological knowledge appropriate for social work education. Students will review basic statistical methods (descriptive and inferential statistics; measures of association), and become familiar with basic parametric and nonparametric techniques. Prerequisite: SW 484 with a grade of C or better; corequisite: SW 486 and 488.

SW 486  Social Work Field Practicum I  (1-6)  

Professionally supervised agency placement for the student so she may relate classroom learning to the practice setting. This experience provides the student with an opportunity to integrate knowledge, values, and practice, to deepen her understanding, and to develop proficiencies for beginning professional practice. A minimum of 480 hours of direct field experience is required for the major in social work. Graded S/U. Corequisite: SW 485 and SW 488. Prerequisites: SW 331, SW 332, SW 333, and SW 334. Fee: $10 per credit hour.

SW 487  Social Work Field Practicum II  (1-6)  

Professionally supervised agency placement for the student so she may relate classroom learning to the practice setting. This experience provides the student with an opportunity to integrate knowledge, values, and practice, to deepen her understanding, and to develop proficiencies for beginning professional practice. A minimum of 480 hours of direct field experience is required for the major in social work. Graded S/U. Corequisite: SW 489. Prerequisites: SW 486 and SW 495. Fee: $10 per credit hour.

SW 488  Social Work Practicum Seminar I  (2)  

A seminar designed to help the student integrate knowledge, practice approaches, and social work values and ethics from course work and field experience. The field placement is the focus for discussion and analysis. Growing self-awareness and a beginning frame of reference for professional practice are emphasized. Corequisite: SW 485 and SW 486. Prerequisites: SW 331, SW 332, SW 333, SW 334.

SW 489  Social Work Practicum Seminar II  (2)  

A seminar designed to help the student integrate knowledge, practice approaches, and social work values and ethics from course work and field experience. The field placement is the focus for discussion and analysis. Growing self-awareness and a beginning frame of reference for professional practice are emphasized. Corequisite: SW 487. Prerequisites: SW 488 and SW 495.

SW 495  Integrative Seminar  (1)  

The social work program comprehensive seminar providing the student an opportunity to examine, in detail, her integration of the knowledge, values, and skills of the profession. Seminar presentations, discussions, and papers are required of each student. Prerequisites: Declared Social Work major, junior status, and permission of the Social Work program director.

SW 497  Independent Research in Social Work  (1-3)  

Specialized research in social work supervised in a tutorial setting. Only six hours in independent work, including SW 397, may apply to the hours required in social work for the major. Prerequisite: Nine hours in SW, junior or senior status, and permission of the instructor and Social Work program director.