Humanistic Studies (HUST)

HUST 103  Lives and Times  (3)  

This introductory course explores the interaction of people from the past with their cultural milieu through a study of works that have cultural or historical importance.

HUST 197  Myth, Legend, and History  (1-3)  

This course studies the ways people talk about their past through myths, legends, and history by focusing on subjects such as the Adam and Eve, the Amazons, Cleopatra, Joan of Arc and Christopher Columbus, among others.

HUST 203  Asian Influence on Western Literature  (3)  

An introduction to the cultures of Korea, China and Japan through literature, history, and film.

HUST 205  History of Famous Women  (3)  

This course looks at the lives of women such as Joan of Arc, Elizabeth I, and Abigail Adams, and places them in the tradition of exceptional women. It examines that tradition as a form of both women’s history and feminist argument, from Roman antiquity to the present.

HUST 212  High Society  (3)  

A social and cultural history of European aristocracy and monarchy from medieval times to the present.

HUST 220  Humanities at Work  (3)  

Curious about how your love of reading and discussion transfer in the “real world”? Eager to understand what the humanities disciplines are--what connects them but also sets them apart from one another? This course explores the practical outputs of literary study and art history (public health, “big data”, business, public service) and as well as the big questions that philosophy and history encourage us to explore: Who am I, and what is my story? What does it mean to listen? What is the relationship between memory and trauma, liberty and learning? The course takes on three key themes: (1) storytelling and translation, (2) memory and memorials, and (3) learning and society. Assignments will be applied in nature: a personal history/critical genealogy project, interviews, a podcast, a digital journal, website design, and archival research. Readings range from short stories and personal essays, to historical documents, images, philosophical arguments, and blog posts on the value of the humanities in and to public life. A “Real Deal” webinar series in which students hear from Saint Mary’s alumnae on how they applied their humanities training to careers in museum work, law, library science, data analysis, entrepreneurship, think tanks, education, and more.

HUST 290  Topics in Humanities  (3)  

Topics in Humanistic Studies not covered in regular department offerings. May be repeated with a different topic.

HUST 292  Reclaiming the Classics for a Diverse and Global World  (3)  

This course looks at the main elements of Greek and Roman culture in a global context through a variety of works: historical, philosophical, and literary. Special attention is paid to the role of women in Greek and Roman society.

HUST 321  Cultural History I: Ancient and Medieval Culture  (3)  

A social, political, intellectual, and artistic history, from Greco-Roman antiquity to the High Middle Ages, focused on Europe in a global context with special attention paid to the role of Christianity. Topics include the “golden age” of Athens, the cultural influence of the Roman Empire, the rise of Christianity and Islam, monasticism, the medieval world view, the rise of royal government, the twelfth-century cultural revolution, and Gothic architecture. Corequisite: HUST 323.

HUST 322  Cultural History II: Medieval and Renaissance Culture  (3)  

A social, political, intellectual, and artistic history, from the Late Middle Ages to the Italian Renaissance, focused on Europe in a global context with special attention paid to the role of Christianity. Topics include the Black Death and its impact, the power of Italian city-states, Renaissance humanism, the cult of the individual, Europe's global interaction, and the evolution of Renaissance art. Corequisite: HUST 324.

HUST 323  Colloquium I: Ancient and Medieval Literature  (3)  

Major literary works from Greco-Roman antiquity to the High Middle Ages. Readings may include Homer’s Odyssey, Sophocles’s Antigone, Virgil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, the Life of Muhammad, The Song of Roland, and The Romance of Tristan. Corequisite: HUST 321.

HUST 324  Colloquium II: Medieval and Renaissance Literature  (3)  

Major literary works from the Late Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Readings may include The Travels of Marco Polo, Dante’s Divine Comedy, Petrarch’s My Secret, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Boccaccio’s Decameron, and Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier. Corequisite: HUST 322.

HUST 390  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Topics in Humanistic Studies not covered in regular department offerings. May be repeated with a different topic.

HUST 461  Cultural History III: Early-Modern Culture  (3)  

A political, intellectual, and artistic history, from the Northern Renaissance to the Age of Napoleon, focused on Europe with special attention paid to the role of Christianity. Topics include the Reformation, English constitutional history, baroque culture, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. Corequisite: HUST 463.

HUST 462  Cultural History IV: Modern Culture  (3)  

A political, intellectual, and artistic history, from the nineteenth century to the present, focused on Europe with special attention paid to the role of Christianity. Topics include ideology in the age of industry, the modernist movement, the world wars, the Cold War, and the post-modern outlook. Corequisite: HUST 464.

HUST 463  Colloquium III: Early-Modern Literature  (3)  

Major literary works, from the Northern Renaissance to the Age of Napoleon. Readings may include More’s Utopia, Montaigne’s Essays, Shakespeare’s Othello, Voltaire’s Candide, Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, Equiano's Interesting Narrative, and Wollstonecraft’s Vindication of the Rights of Woman. Corequisite: HUST 461.

HUST 464  Colloquium IV: Modern Literature  (3)  

Major literary works, from the nineteenth century to the present. Readings may include Romantic poetry, Turgenev’s Fathers and Sons, Freud’s Civilization and Its Discontents, Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, Camus’s The Plague, and Allende’s The House of the Spirits. Corequisite: HUST 462.

HUST 490  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Topics in Humanistic Studies not covered in regular department offerings. May be repeated with a different topic.

HUST 497  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Independent study for outstanding students. May be repeated.

HUST 499  Internship  (1-3)  

Practical experience in a field related to Humanistic Studies. Graded S/U. May be repeated.