Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 110  Introductory Philosophy  (3)  

Readings and discussions designed to introduce the student to the major areas and problems of philosophy through a study of the writings of classical and contemporary thinkers. (4 semester hours when taught as writing proficiency). There are no prerequisites for this course.

PHIL 220  Introduction to Logic  (3)  

A study of the theories and techniques of formal logic in its traditional and contemporary forms. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 230  Socrates to Scholasticism  (3)  

A study of the Greek origins of Western philosophy, with special attention to Plato and Aristotle and their impact on medieval thought. Class discussions throughout the term are grounded in a close reading of primary source texts. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 233  Philosophy of Gender  (3)  

An investigation of how gender construction has influenced how philosophy has been done and received historically, exploring how past and present thinkers view reality, knowledge and the good through the lens of gender identity (and the intersections of gender and other identities, including race, class and sexuality). There are no prerequisites for this course.

PHIL 235  Philosophy of Human Existence  (3)  

A study of important European philosophers from the 19th and 20th centuries who are associated with the existentialist movement. There are no prerequisites to this course.

PHIL 236  American Philosophy  (3)  

A study of representative American philosophies, including those emerging from classical European traditions, American women philosophers, and African American and Native American thinkers. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 243  Introduction to Feminist Philosophy  (3)  

An inquiry into the meaning of gender and its philosophical implications. Questions of identity, knowledge, ethics, race, and global responsibility will be considered both from historical and contemporary perspectives. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 245  Philosophy of World Cultures  (3)  

A study of representative selected texts from Asian, African, Native American, or other alternative philosophical traditions. There are no prerequisites for this course.

PHIL 247  Philosophy of Religion  (3)  

An investigation of the major philosophical issues in religious thought as posed by both critics and advocates. Special attention is paid to the relation between religious faith and knowledge. There are no prerequisites to this course.

PHIL 250  Philosophy and Disabilities  (3)  

This course explores questions raised by the existence of various kinds of disability. What is it like to experience disabilities? How do we understand disabilities? What ethical problems are raised by disabilities, and how do we respond to these problems? Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 251  Business Ethics  (3)  

A study of the moral issues raised by contemporary business practices. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 252  Philosophy of Art  (3)  

A study of both traditional and contemporary philosophical theories concerning beauty, the nature of aesthetic experience, principles of criticism, and the function and character of creativity in the arts. There are no prerequisites to this course.

PHIL 253  Philosophy of Politics  (3)  

A study of theories of society and the state which may include classical, contemporary, feminist, or ethnic visions of real and ideal community. There are no pre-requisites to this course.

PHIL 254  Social Justice  (3)  

A philosophical study of problems of justice in the contemporary world. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 255  Medical Ethics  (3)  

A philosophical inquiry into moral issues that arise in modern medicine. Some of the issues to be considered include euthanasia, abortion, care for the dying, patients' rights, limits on medical rights, limits on medical experimentation with human beings, defining death, and the patient-therapist relationship. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 256  Environmental Ethics  (3)  

A focused introduction to ethical thinking organized around themes that pertain to contemporary environmental issues. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 290  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Topics in Philosophy not covered in regular departmental offerings. May be repeated with a different topic. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 291  Dialogue and Civil Discourse  (1)  

Participants in a democracy should have the skills to identify and evaluate arguments from various perspectives on contemporary social and political issues. They must also be able to articulate their own views clearly and engage with the views of others who disagree. In this course, we will develop skills to engage in constructive dialogue with others who have different views on social and political issues. We will engage a controversial contemporary issue each week (for example: abortion, free speech and safe spaces on campus, immigration, religion in the public space). Background readings will consist |of contemporary media articles drawn from a range of sources and viewpoints. Students will investigate their own core assumptions and beliefs about key issues and will listen to the views and experiences of others in the class. Occasional guest speakers will model civil discourse by discussing issues from differing perspectives. Assignments will consist of keeping a journal of the course experience and developing a class-led event to share the skills of dialogue and civil discourse with the broader campus community. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 292  Philosophy of Walking  (1)  

This one-credit course in the philosophy of walking provides an opportunity not only to philosophize about walking, but to philosophize while walking. The course meets once a week to discuss and write briefly about the readings for the week, to go for a walk, and to discuss and record insights that come to one along the way. These recorded insights will provide the raw material for completing a project due at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 302  Global Justice  (3)  

This course will explore issues of global justice, poverty, inequality, and human rights, synthesizing reflections on the philosophical foundations of such issues with more concrete reflections on specific challenges facing various regions throughout the world (also listed as JUST 302).

PHIL 331  Descartes to Skepticism  (3)  

A study of major themes in 17th and 18th century Western philosophy beginning with Descartes and tracing the development of modern thought through Hume. Class discussions throughout the term are grounded in a close reading of primary source texts. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 332  Kant and His Critics  (3)  

A careful reading of Kant accompanied by a study of critical responses to his philosophy. The aim is an understanding of Kant’s philosophy as a whole and its relevance to contemporary thought. Prerequisite: Sophia Philosophical Worldviews and PHIL 331. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 333  19th Century Philosophy  (3)  

A study of philosophical questions emerging in the wake of the enlightenment, examining the implications for religion, politics, history, and reason. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 334  Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas  (3)  

This course develops the philosophy of Tomas Aquinas both as a dialectical method and with respect to a philosophical issue. The issues, which vary from time to time depending on timeliness and student interest, include Aquinas?s theory of natural law, natural theology, and the theory of human nature and knowledge. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 341  Mind, Knowledge, and Reality  (3)  

A critical investigation of traditional and contemporary theories of mind along with questions concerning the origin, nature, and validity of human knowledge. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 343  20th Century Philosophy  (3)  

A study of significant contemporary intellectual movements on the continent of Europe, in Great Britain and America since World War II, e.g., phenomenology, post-structuralism, analytic philosophy, and neo-pragmatism. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 345  Philosophy of Language  (3)  

A critical investigation of both analytic and continental theories of language with an emphasis on questions of meaning, reference, and interpretation. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 348  Philosophy of Science  (3)  

An investigation of the meaning and use of scientific concepts and methods. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 354  Ethics  (3)  

A study and critique of selected ethical theories with some application to current moral issues. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 355  Philosophy of Law  (3)  

The philosophy of law considers the relation of law to justice. This course examines legal positivism, social contract, and natural law as accounts of the links between law and justice, including their role in contemporary understanding of the U.S. Constitution. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 390  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Topics in Philosophy not covered in regular departmental offerings. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 410  Philosophers of Consequence  (3)  

An in-depth study of the work of one or two important philosophers who will be selected on the basis of instructor preference and student interest. Secondary literature may be consulted but the bulk of the reading will be primary sources. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 495  Senior Seminar: New Methods in Philosophy  (3)  

An intensive study of new methods and thinkers in philosophy. Both primary and secondary texts may be consulted. Prerequisite: completion of the Philosophical Worldviews Sophia Program.

PHIL 496  Senior Thesis  (3)  

An independent study under the supervision of a faculty advisor who guides the writing of a major paper.

PHIL 497  Independent Study  (1-3)  

An opportunity for students to do independent study. Content dependent on student interests and background. May be repeated.