Modern Languages and Cultures

Department Description

The Department of Modern Languages and Cultures offers Bachelor of Arts in Spanish. It also offers a program for minors in French, Italian, and Spanish. The Department offers General Education language courses at the introductory and intermediate levels. Languages offered within the Sophia Program in liberal learning include Arabic, Chinese, French, Italian, and Spanish. French, Italian, and Spanish are taught at the introductory and intermediate levels, and Arabic and Mandarin Chinese at the introductory level. Saint Mary’s students may continue the study of Arabic and Chinese beyond the introductory or intermediate level at the University of Notre Dame.

At the introductory and intermediate levels, the program of Modern Languages and Cultures aims to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language. Class discussion and activities in the Language Learning Center supplement a thorough foundation in language structure. Cultural aspects of the various countries are emphasized in order to foster the student’s appreciation of cultural diversity and interest in international affairs.

The aim of the advanced courses is twofold: to broaden and deepen the student’s knowledge and appreciation of the literature, culture, and history of the country or countries studied.

Students planning to major in Spanish, or minor in French, Italian, or Spanish, are encouraged to study abroad with one of the affiliated College programs, or under any plan approved by the department. They should see their major advisor about which courses taken abroad will satisfy major or minor requirements.

Study Abroad

Saint Mary’s has a long history of providing quality international programs as an essential part of our educational mission—forming women leaders who will make a difference in the world. As this world becomes increasingly interdependent, the College offers an expanding range of semester, year, semester break, and summer study and service programs in a wide variety of countries, and encourages students to take advantage of them. Learn more about the various Study Abroad opportunities.

Foreign Language Placement

The language requirement, competency in a modern language, may be fulfilled by completing two semesters of the same language at the appropriate level.

  • For students continuing a language they have already studied in high school, the department will advise placement into all levels based on the results of the foreign language placement exam.
  • Students who choose to complete their Sophia requirement in Modern Languages by enrolling in the language they studied in high school (at 111-112 level or higher or equivalent) will receive four additional elective credit hours upon successful completion of their two-semester requirement in their first year.

Teacher Preparation

The Modern Languages Department and Cultures in conjunction with the Education Department offers courses leading to state licensing for Spanish.

Advanced Placement Exemption

Eight college hours in French, German, or Spanish are granted to entering students who receive a grade of four (4) or above on the Advanced Placement Examination or a score of 5 on the International Baccalaureate examination. Entering students scoring 640 or above in French or 630 or above in German and Spanish on the SAT II Modern Language Examination are exempted from the College foreign language requirement but receive no college credit. Entering students scoring 58 or above on the CLEP Modern Language Examination receive four college hours, which satisfy one semester of the language requirement.

International Programs

Saint Mary’s is affiliated with the center for Spanish Studies Abroad in Seville, Spain, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Córdoba, Argentina, for Spanish­ language study. The College is also affiliated with the Université Catholique de l’Ouest in Angers, France, for students studying French abroad, Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane, Morocco, for Arabic and/or French, John Cabot University in Rome, Italy, and the University of Nanjing or East China Normal University in Shanghai, China, for Chinese. Students of German may apply for study at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. 

Study abroad in an immersion program, including our affiliated programs in Angers, Córdoba, Seville, San Juan, Innsbruck, and Nanjing, requires previous study of the language. Prior study of Italian at Saint Mary’s is strongly recommended for students going to Rome. It is possible to study in Innsbruck, Morocco, San Juan, and Shanghai without any previous study of the specific country’s language(s) since there are courses offered in English at these programs, although prior study of the country’s language(s) is strongly recommended. For Angers, students with intermediate French language skills will take primarily French language courses, but may also take 1–2 content courses at UCO. We strongly recommend that interested students complete a year of college-­level intermediate French. Students should consult with their academic advisor in the Modern Languages Department or with the Chair of Modern Languages regarding the specific foreign language study requirement for any of the affiliated programs.

John Cabot University Incentive Credit Policy

Students who, after completing the second semester of language instruction, enroll in JCU’s IT 201 (3rd semester,) will receive two additional elective credits upon successful completion of the course. Students who, after completing the third semester of language instruction, enroll in JCU’s IT 202 (4th semester,) will receive one additional elective credit upon successful completion of the course.

Programs

Individual programs for those spending a semester or a year abroad are carefully planned with the student’s academic advisor and/or foreign study advisor.

Department Chair

Ty West
115 Spes Unica
574-284-5367

Faculty

D. Jorza, T. Smithson, R. Solarte-Hensgen, U. Taccheri, M. Valencia, T. West, J. Zachman

Student Learning Outcomes

Communication Skills

  • Demonstrates an intermediate proficiency according to the ACTFL guidelines in a minimum of three skills out of four, one of which must be productive.

Critical Thinking Skills

  • Demonstrates intercultural understanding by recognizing and analyzing cultural misconceptions and the influence of her own cultural identity on her interaction with others.
  • Demonstrates the ability to analyze and interpret complex texts and artifacts intended for native speakers within their cultural and/or historical context.

Knowledge

  • Explains the practices of the culture(s) and describes how these cultural practices compare to her own.
  • Explains the principal features of cultural identity and the culture(s) of the language.
  • Identifies the cultures’ significant literary movements, genres, and works.
  •  Identifies salient features of the geography, history, and culture of the countries/regions where the language is spoken.
  • Demonstrates and understanding of the structure of the target language by using the language with accuracy in speaking and writing.
  • Identifies the significant artistic production of the culture(s).

Arabic Courses

MLAR 101  Introductory Arabic I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Arabic language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Arabic and Islamic cultures. Strongly recommended for prospective students of the Morocco program. Students who have earned high school credits in Arabic enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLAR 102  Introductory Arabic II  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Arabic language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Arabic and Islamic cultures. Strongly recommended for prospective students of the Morocco program. Students who have earned high school credits in Arabic enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLAR 103  Arabic Conversation and Reading I  (1-2)  

Designed to develop the ability to hold everyday conversation in Arabic and to introduce the student to Arabic cultures. Strongly recommended for study abroad in Morocco.

MLAR 104  Arabic Conversation and Reading II  (1-2)  

Designed to develop the ability to hold everyday conversation in Arabic and to introduce the student to Arabic cultures. Strongly recommended for study abroad in Morocco.

MLAR 220  Inter Arabic Writing & Convers  (3)  

Designed for students who have completed MLAR 101, MLAR 102, MLAR 103 and/or MLAR 104 or who have an equivalent competency, MLAR 220 focuses on Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) as well as spoken Arabic. It is designed for non-native Arabic speakers who wish to acquire a proficiency in Arabic Conversation and Arabic Writing which will enable them to communicate fluently with native speakers on a wide range of competencies and strategies.

MLAR 297  Independent Study  (1-3)  
MLAR 397  Independent Study in Arabic  (1-3)  

Chinese Courses

MLCH 101  Introductory Mandarin Chinese I  (4)  

This two semester sequence is an introduction to Mandarin Chinese for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Chinese culture. Strongly recommended for prospective students of Saint Mary’s China Summer Program and China Semester Programs in Shanghai and Nanjing. Required for participation in the Nanjing, China Program. Students who have earned high school credits in Mandarin Chinese enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLCH 102  Introductory Mandarin Chinese II  (4)  

This two semester sequence is an introduction to Mandarin Chinese for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Chinese culture. Strongly recommended for prospective students of Saint Mary’s China Summer Program and China Semester Programs in Shanghai and Nanjing. Required for participation in the Nanjing, China Program. Students who have earned high school credits in Mandarin Chinese enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLCH 103  Mandarin Chinese Conversation and Reading I  (1-2)  

Designed to develop the ability to hold everyday conversation in Mandarin Chinese and to introduce the student to Chinese culture. Strongly recommended for prospective students of Saint Mary’s China Summer Program and China Semester Program.

MLCH 104  Mandarin Chinese Conversation and Reading II  (1-2)  

Designed to develop the ability to hold everyday conversation in Mandarin Chinese and to introduce the student to Chinese culture. Strongly recommended for prospective students of Saint Mary’s China Summer Program and China Semester Program.

MLCH 190  Special Topics  (1-4)  

French Courses

MLFR 101  Introductory French I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the French language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to French and Francophone cultures. Strongly recommended for study abroad in Morocco. Students who have earned high school credits in French enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLFR 102  Introductory French II  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the French language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to French and Francophone cultures. Strongly recommended for study abroad in Morocco. Students who have earned high school credits in French enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLFR 111  Intermediate French I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in French focusing on all four skills: speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on French and Francophone cultures. Students enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLFR 112  Intermediate French II  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in French focusing on all four skills: speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on French and Francophone cultures. Students enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam. MLFR 111 is required for study abroad in Angers, France for students applying after completing MLFR 101 and MLFR 102.

MLFR 203  The Culture of the Francophone World: Africa and Asia  (3)  

Designed to continue the development of the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course will combine language practice with a content focused on contemporary social and cultural issues within France and the Francophone world, with a particular focus on Africa and Asia. Prerequisites:MLFR 111, 112, or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLFR 304  The Culture of the Francophone World: North American and the Caribbean  (3)  

Building on and continuing the development of the four skills—speaking listening, reading, and writing, this course will combine language practice with a content focused on contemporary social and cultural issues within France and the Francophone world, with a particular focus on North America and the Caribbean. Prerequisites:MLFR 111, 112, or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLFR 305  Advanced French Composition  (3)  

Designed to develop the student’s writing skills through the practice of writing as process and the study of French structure and vocabulary. Various themes, styles, and types of composition are considered. May be repeated once for credit if taken during study abroad. Prerequisites:MLFR 111, 112, or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLFR 306  Advanced French Conversation  (3)  

Designed to develop the accuracy and fluency of the student’s spoken French. May be repeated once for credit if taken during study abroad. Prerequisites:MLFR 111, 112, or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLFR 320  French and Francophone Cinema  (3)  

This course provides an overview of French and Francophone cinema. Through readings and film screenings, students will learn about major French and Francophone filmmakers. In addition, student will acquire the vocabulary and language skills to discuss cinema. Prerequisites:MLFR 111, 112, or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLFR 340  Contemporary France  (3)  

French cultural identity and contemporary social and economic issues, particularly those connected to its former colonies, are studied through a variety of texts, films, and web-based media sources. Prerequisites:MLFR 111, 112, or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLFR 397  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Provides qualified advanced students with an opportunity for independent study and research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

MLFR 497  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Provides qualified advanced students with an opportunity for independent study and research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

Italian Courses

MLIT 101  Introductory Italian I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Italian language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Italian culture. Strongly recommended for prospective students of the Rome Program. Students who have earned high school credits in Italian enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLIT 102  Introductory Italian II  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Italian language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Italian culture. Strongly recommended for prospective students of the Rome Program. Students who have earned high school credits in Italian enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLIT 103  Building Italian Speaking Skills I  (1)  

Designed to develop the ability to hold everyday conversation in Italian and to introduce the student to Italian culture. Strongly recommended for students planning to study in Rome program.

MLIT 104  Building Italian Speaking Skills II  (1)  

Designed to develop the ability to hold everyday conversation in Italian and to introduce the student to Italian culture. Strongly recommended for students planning to study in Rome program.

MLIT 111  Intermediate Italian  (4)  

This course is a continuation of MLIT 101 - MLIT 102 and is designed to develop an intermediate proficiency in Italian focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Italian culture. Prerequisite: MLIT 102 or equivalent, or the requisite score on the Italian placement exam, or permission of the department. Strongly recommended but not required for study in Rome.

MLIT 123  Intermediate Italian Conversation I  (1)  

Designed to develop conversational Italian and to explore Italian culture. Strongly recommended but not required for study in Rome.

MLIT 220  Advanced Italian Conversation and Composition  (3)  

This course is designed to develop accuracy and fluency in spoken and written Italian, and improve students’ self-confidence in the target language. May be repeated once for credit if taken during study abroad. Prerequisites:MLIT 111 or equivalent or permission of the department

MLIT 310  Advanced Italian Grammar  (3)  

The primary objective of this course is to review the most salient and difficult points of Italian grammar. Prerequisite: MLIT 112 or equivalent or permission of the department. Prerequisites:MLIT 111 or equivalent or permission of the department

MLIT 320  Italian Cinema, 1945–1965  (3)  

An overview of Italian cinematography during the two decades following WW II, with special emphasis on the masterpieces of Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Fellini, Antonioni, and Pasolini. Prerequisites:MLIT 111 or equivalent or permission of the department

MLIT 350  Italian Short Story  (3)  

An introduction to the Italian short story. Prerequisites:MLIT 111 or equivalent or permission of the department

MLIT 360  Italian Cultural Studies  (3)  

Designed to give students an understanding of modern Italian culture, and the formation of national values through the study of meaningful historical developments from 1870 to the present and an analysis of “high” and “popular” culture. Prerequisites:MLIT 111 or equivalent or permission of the department

MLIT 497  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Provides qualified advanced students with an opportunity for independent study and research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

MLIT 499  Internship  (1-3)  

Practical experience in a position that requires the use of Italian on a regular basis. Position may be in a variety of fields. A reflection paper appropriate to the nature of the internship must be submitted by the end of the semester. Requires a faculty supervisor. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the department.

Spanish Courses

MLSP 101  Introductory Spanish I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Spanish language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Hispanic cultures. Students who have earned high school credits in Spanish enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLSP 102  Introductory Spanish II  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Spanish language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Hispanic cultures. Students who have earned high school credits in Spanish enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLSP 111  Intermediate Spanish I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Hispanic cultures. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and MLSP 111 - MLSP 112 or MLSP 115 - MLSP 116 is required for study abroad in Cordoba, Argentina. Students enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLSP 112  Intermediate Spanish II  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Hispanic cultures. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and MLSP 111 - MLSP 112 or MLSP 115 - MLSP 116 is required for study abroad in Cordoba, Argentina. Students enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLSP 115  Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, but with increased attention given to reading, writing, and grammar, as appropriate to heritage speakers. Emphasis is also placed on Hispanic cultures. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and MLSP 111 - MLSP 112 or MLSP 115 - MLSP 116 is required for study abroad in Cordoba, Argentina. Only heritage speakers who receive the requisite score on the Spanish placement exam may enroll in this sequence.

MLSP 116  Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers II  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, but with increased attention given to reading, writing, and grammar, as appropriate to heritage speakers. Emphasis is also placed on Hispanic cultures. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and MLSP 111 - MLSP 112 or MLSP 115 - MLSP 116 is required for study abroad in Cordoba, Argentina. Only heritage speakers who receive the requisite score on the Spanish placement exam may enroll in this sequence.

MLSP 208  Spanish Conversation  (3)  

Designed to develop the accuracy and fluency of the student’s spoken Spanish. May be repeated once for credit if taken during study abroad. Prerequisites: (MLSP 111, MLSP 112,) or (MLSP 115, MLSP 116,) or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLSP 210  Advanced Grammar/Composition  (3)  

A thorough review of the more challenging grammatical aspects of the Spanish language is applied to the development of writing skills. Prerequisites: (MLSP 111, MLSP 112,) or (MLSP 115, MLSP 116,) or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLSP 212  Spanish Composition  (3)  

Designed to develop the student’s writing skills through the practice of writing as process and the study of Spanish structure and vocabulary. Various themes, styles, and types of composition are considered. May be repeated once for credit if taken during study abroad. Prerequisites: (MLSP 111, MLSP 112,) or (MLSP 115, MLSP 116,) or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLSP 316  Civilization of Spain  (3)  

An introduction to Spanish civilization through a study of significant aspects of its history, literature, art, and thought. Prerequisites: (MLSP 111, MLSP 112,) or (MLSP 115, MLSP 116,) or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLSP 317  Latin American Civilization  (3)  

The development of Latin America from pre-Colombian civilizations to the present. While lectures and discussions will be within a historical and chronological framework, emphasis will be on major social, economic, political, artistic, and ideological developments of Latin American countries. Prerequisites: (MLSP 111, MLSP 112,) or (MLSP 115, MLSP 116,) or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLSP 320  Introduction to Hispanic Cultural Studies  (3)  

This course is an introduction to the study of cultural artifacts (literature, film, photography, journalism, art, theatre, etc.) from the Hispanic world. Students will acquire the necessary skills and critical vocabulary to carry out analyses of multiple types of cultural production from different historical periods and associated with a variety of socio-political contexts.

MLSP 424  Contemporary Spanish Women Writers  (3)  

While focusing on reading and analysis of literary production by Spanish women writers of the 20th century, the course also explores the changing status of women in Spain, examining issues of personal identity, feminist discourse, changing gender roles, and literary movements. Prerequisites:MLSP 320 or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLSP 426  Constructing Contemporary Latin America  (3)  

This course is an introduction to the history, politics, and cultures of the geopolitical region known as Latin America. This class will explore the region’s historical, political, economic, and cultural significance in today’s world. Studying the constructs of Latin America from the time of colonial encounters to the movements of independence and their post-colonial legacies, students will examine relevant historical and contemporary issues regarding colonialism, nation-state formation, neoliberalism, and globalization, immigration and the so-called war on drugs through an interdisciplinary approach that includes films, literature, history, and politics. In addition to considering the processes of democratization, students will analyze sociopolitical phenomena such as dictatorships, the rise of populism, and guerrilla movements, among others. Finally, students will examine the political struggles of ethnic movements to address long-standing gender and racial inequalities. Prerequisites:MLSP 320 or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLSP 427  Contemporary Latin American Narrative  (3)  

A study of selected novels and short stories by the most influential Latin American writers of the 20th century. Prerequisites:MLSP 320 or equivalent or permission of the department.

MLSP 490  Special Topics  (1-3)  

An intensive study of a literary movement, theme, genre, or author. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

MLSP 497  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Provides qualified advanced students with an opportunity for independent study and research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

MLSP 499  Internship  (1-3)  

Practical experience in a position that requires the use of Spanish on a regular basis. Position may be in a variety of fields. A reflection paper appropriate to the nature of the internship must be submitted by the end of the semester. Requires a faculty supervisor. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the department.

Note: Minimum prerequisite for all 200 and 300 level course listings: MLSP 111 Intermediate Spanish IMLSP 112 Intermediate Spanish II, MLSP 115 Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers IMLSP 116 Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers II

Modern Languages in Translation Chinese

MLTC 280  Modern and Contemporary Chinese Society and Culture  (3)  

This course offers an introduction to the history of China and its contemporary society. Students will gain knowledge about the historical facts, cultural changes, diverse ethnicities, women/gender issues, as well as its unique cultural heritage. Students explore the diverse culture of China while also considering race, gender, and class issues as well as concerns for social justice.

Modern Language Courses (MODL) 

MODL 197  Independent Study  (2)  
MODL 445  Teaching Modern Languages in Middle/High School  (3)  

Introduces students to language acquisition theory and its implications for the classroom. Topics covered include development of student competency in each of the four skills (reading, listening, speaking, writing), the teaching of culture, and the use of authentic materials. This course is organized around the National Standards and includes familiarization with the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. Recommended for any language major, especially those considering teaching as a profession, as well as those students considering graduate study. Taught in English. Fall semester only. Prerequisite: EDUC 345 or permission of instructor. (Also listed as EDUC 445.)

MODERN LANGUAGE in translation spanish (MLTS) 

MLTS 135  Women Making Mischief: Theatre and Performance as Protest in the Spanish-Speaking World  (3)  

What is theatre? How does a theatrical text construct meaning and how is meaning communicated in performance? How can theatre denounce injustice? In this Critical Thinking Seminar we will consider these questions and more as we study the work of contemporary Hispanic women playwrights from Latin America and Spain. We will figuratively travel through time and space in the Spanish-speaking world (including a visit with Latinas in the U.S.) as we examine the works of these dramatists and performers and the ways in which their work highlights and criticizes injustice, violence, and oppression.

MLTS 390  Special Topics  (3)  

Four Year Plan for a B.A. in Spanish

The Spanish major consists of a total of eight courses beyond the MLSP 111/112 sequence, distributed as follows:

Two courses at the 200-level- these include MLSP 210 Advanced Grammar, MLSP 212 Composition, and MLSP 208 Conversation

Two courses at the 300-level - MLSP 320 Introduction to Hispanic Cultural Studies and either MLSP 316 or 317, Spanish or Latin American Civilization, respectively.

Four advanced seminars in cultural studies (at the 400 level).

The plan outlined below includes study abroad in the sophomore year.  This is typical of our majors but not required.  Students may study abroad in almost any semester (or summer) and get up to 3-4 courses for the major (up to 2 courses in the summer).  Some of these courses may also fulfill Sophia requirements when taken abroad.  For example, Latin American and Spanish Civilization, when taken in one of our programs in Argentina, Spain, or Puerto Rico, will fulfill a History requirement.  Additionally, while abroad, students may also fulfill one or more of the following Sophia’s, which, because they are in taught in Spanish, may also count as advanced seminars in the major--this is not an all-inclusive list, just a few examples--Art History (Historical Perspectives), Spanish Society or Political Science (Social Science I), etc.

Plan of Study Grid
First Year
First SemesterCredits
MLSP 111
Intermediate Spanish I (Sophia Language I )
or Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers I
4
CTS or W (3cr/4cr)
SPLL 101 (1 cr)
Sophia (3cr)
Sophia (3cr)
Elective (1-3cr)
 Credits4
Second Semester
MLSP 112
Intermediate Spanish II (Sophia Language II)
or Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers II
4
CTS or W (3cr/4cr)
Sophia (3cr)
Sophia (3cr)
Sophia (3cr)
 Credits4
Second Year
First Semester
MLSP 210
Advanced Grammar/Composition
or Spanish Composition
3
Sophia (3cr)
Sophia (3cr)
 Credits3
Second Semester
Study Abroad: 3 or 4 courses in the major which may also be Sophias
MLSP 208 Spanish Conversation (If no study abroad ) 3
Sophia (3cr)
Sophia (3cr)
 Credits3
Third Year
First Semester
MLSP 320 Introduction to Hispanic Cultural Studies 3
MLSP 4xx * 3
Sophia (4cr)
 Credits6
Second Semester
MLSP 316
Civilization of Spain (Unless taken on Study abroad)
or Latin American Civilization
3
MLSP 4xx * 3
 Credits6
Fourth Year
First Semester
MLSP 4xx * 3
 Credits3
Second Semester
MLSP 4xx * 3
 Credits3
 Total Credits32
*

One of these seminars may be fulfilled while on study abroad.