Sophia Program Course Offerings

For First-Year Students Fall 2019

Knowledge Acquisition and Integration of Learning (LO1)

Some course descriptions below have been expanded to provide more information. For official course descriptions refer to the Saint Mary’s College Bulletin.

Cultures and Systems

Literature

ENLT 109W  Language and Literature  (4)  

A range of courses allowing students to earn three literature hours and fulfill the writing proficiency requirement. May be repeated.

This course introduces students to reading and writing about literature at the college level. While reading novels, biographies, memoirs and poetry by and about Saint Mary’s women, students gain skill in accurate, insightful interpretation of texts, and develop their ability to write clearly phrased, logically organized prose. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 109W  Language and Literature  (4)  

A range of courses allowing students to earn three literature hours and fulfill the writing proficiency requirement. May be repeated.

“Where are you now?” This question begins countless cell-phone conversations for a reason: Speech craves a context. To process what someone is saying, we need to assess where they are coming from — both literally and figuratively. The same need factors into our understanding of literature. Wherever dialogue occurs in poems, plays, short stories, and novels, it requires careful scrutiny. Situating speakers within dialogue (determining what they know, what they don’t, what they’re hiding, what they’re feeling, what they want to say, what they might be unable to say, or why they’re talking) is one of the vital aspects of reading, among others, that we will practice on a variety of works. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 109W  Language and Literature  (4)  

A range of courses allowing students to earn three literature hours and fulfill the writing proficiency requirement. May be repeated.

This course explores the techniques and purposes of world building in literature. Any written text uses words to guide its reader in the creation of an imaginary place different from the present physical reality surrounding that reader. In literary texts, the constructions that result from the process of reading are sensuously vivid, emotionally compelling, and intellectually engaging, so that the reader may feel that she has entered another world. One useful way to improve one’s understanding and enjoyment of literature, then, is to consider how literary texts guide their readers in a process of mental construction that results in something that can be experienced as an imagined world. The class’s readings will give particular attention to the genres of science fiction and fantasy, which foreground the project of world building. The reader of a work of science fiction, for example, expects to go to another planet, to the future, to an alternate history of the world, or some other imagined reality that differs from her own. Other types, other genres of literature approach world building differently. Poetry, drama, realist fiction, and even non-fiction each undertake world building in distinctive ways. This course will include works of literature drawn from each of these genres and from a variety of cultures, so that we can consider how cultural frameworks inform literary world building. We’ll read contemporary science fiction and fantasy by Ursula Le Guin and Jo Walton, Homer’s Odyssey in the new translation by Emily Wilson, a Shakespeare play, Aldo Leopold’s non-fiction classic A Sand County Almanac, and poetry by John Donne, Joy Harjo, and current Poet Laureate Tracy Smith. As a W course, the main assignments for this course will be essays. Four out-of-class essays and two in-class essays will be assigned, preparing students for the end-of-semester portfolio review. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 109W  Language and Literature  (4)  

A range of courses allowing students to earn three literature hours and fulfill the writing proficiency requirement. May be repeated.

This course will examine depictions of death and dying in literature, exploring the different ways in which writers have portrayed the experience of facing death, the physical realities of death, the process of grief and mourning, and ideas about the afterlife. Reading from a wide range of texts by authors like Leo Tolstoy, Nella Larsen, and Virginia Woolf, students will practice close reading and apply a variety of critical perspectives to the literature they read. Writing assignments will ask students to practice building effective arguments, offering textual evidence, and communicating their ideas clearly and logically. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 109W  Language and Literature  (4)  

A range of courses allowing students to earn three literature hours and fulfill the writing proficiency requirement. May be repeated.

We are surrounded by digital texts: clickbait, ads, listicles, thinkpieces, long-form and short-form essays. Why do we read some of these rather than others? Better question: how is a given digital text written in order to appeal to a particular audience? This course will explore some of these digital genres and their print-based antecedents, including authors like Montaigne, Woolf, and Didion. Students will learn to read, analyze, and compose texts in order to become more engaged and critical of online cultural trends. Priority seating for multilingual students. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 109W  Language and Literature  (4)  

A range of courses allowing students to earn three literature hours and fulfill the writing proficiency requirement. May be repeated.

This course introduces students to reading and writing about literature at the college level. We’ll work toward this goal by working together to carefully dissect a handful of notable voices in 20th and 21st century short fiction, analyzing and imitating sample texts to reveal how they work on stylistic and mechanical levels to broaden your sense of the decisions available to your own writing — how small choices in diction and syntax, organization, and presentation, can affect your voice on the page and the way that voice is received by readers across writing contexts. Course reading includes fiction by Jamaica Kincaid, Tobias Wolff, Margaret Atwood, Jhumpa Lahiri, Haruki Murakami, Alice Munro, and others. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

HUST 103  Lives and Times  (3)  

This introductory course explores the interaction of people from the past with their cultural milieu through a study of works that have cultural or historical importance.

This course features lively classroom discussion and introduces you to a wide range of fascinating people throughout time, whether powerful or downtrodden, famous or obscure, free spirits or homebodies. To see what makes these people tick, we will read a variety of works that take us to the very core of their being — fictional accounts as well as real-life stories that include biographies, diaries, autobiographies, and memoirs. We try to answer the sorts of questions that we all have to ask ourselves: What makes a good life? How does my ethnicity, gender, geographic locale, or historical setting make me who I am? What do I owe my parents? How do I balance the need to be my own person with the need to belong to the group? This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Social Responsibility A.

History 

HIST 103  World Civilization I  (3)  

A study of human civilization from its origins to about 1500 A.D. The story of the human spirit arising from the primitive environs of the earliest societies to develop the ideas, institutions and tools that assured all humanity a meaningful existence will be told. The trials and triumphs of humanity everywhere will be highlighted through detailed discussions and audiovisual presentations about the great civilizations of the past. While lectures and discussions will be within a chronological framework, emphasis will be on the rise and fulfillment of cultures and the people who created them.

The great societies of world history have created the cultural heritages that still frame our modern lives. The most important learning outcomes of this course will be to introduce students to those histories and to help them develop the critical thinking skills involved in understanding, assessing, and writing them. History has shaped the world we live in. To paraphrase William Faulkner, the past is never dead— it’s not even past. Thus, an important goal of this course is to present a truly global history of those societies from the origins of mankind to the early modern period and to connect that history with the important issues and cultural identities that shape our world today.

HIST 104   World Civilization II  (3)  

A study of the modern world from about 1500 A.D. to the present. The great civilizations of Europe, America, Asia and Africa will be discussed with detailed descriptions and audio-visual presentations on the vast empires under which they thrived and the energetic leaders who created them. While lectures and discussions will be within a chronological framework, emphasis will be on the new developments in philosophy, religion, politics, arts, literature, ethics, society, and science and technology—all of which resulted in the creation of the world we live in today.

This course also satisfies LO3 Global Learning B. (FILLED)

HIST 201  United States History to 1865  (3)  

This course will trace America from multiple beginnings—Native American, African, and European—through the major developments and events that led to the Civil War. It focuses on conquest, slavery, the development of colonial economies and societies, politics, culture, and the lived experiences of everyday women and men.

What does it mean for the United States of America to be the “City on the Hill?” Historically, it has meant very different things, but many Americans still see their country as an example of freedom and opportunity, a beacon of hope, and a model for the rest of the world. The theme of our course is freedom, for as Eric Foner, the author of our textbook, writes, “No idea is more essential to Americans’ sense of themselves as individuals and as a nation than freedom.” But, “freedom is not a fixed timeless category with a single unchanging definition...the history of the United States is, in part, a story of debates, disagreements, and struggles over freedom...the meaning of freedom has been constructed not only in congressional debates and political treatises, but on plantations and picket lines, in parlors and even bedrooms” (Foner, p. xxxviii-xxxix). A major focus of our critical exploration of American history will be to analyze and reflect on changing understandings of the freedom that defines us as Americans. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Social Responsibility A. Section 72786 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

A British officer serving under “Gentleman” Johnny Burgoyne in the American Revolution remarked in his journal, after Burgoyne surrendered his entire army to a victorious collection of ragtag American farmers and militia, “It seemed that I was gazing upon a new race of men.” Indeed, for the British it seemed as if the Americans had turned the world upside down, that a “new race” had arisen in the forests of the “New World.” Who were these new people, and what was (and is) an American? This course examines this question through the disciplines of history and literature. To gain a deeper understanding of the American character, we will be probing its cultural and intellectual roots in the time period between the first European settlements and the end of the most divisive conflict in American history, the Civil War.

A close scrutiny of our past tells us a good deal about our present situation and perhaps even gives us a glimpse of our future.
This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

Modern Languages

All bachelor degree programs require the successful completion of a full year of foreign language study: two sequential courses at the appropriate level, as determined by the student’s interests and her abilities as indicated by the online placement exam. A student who is enrolling at the introductory level (101) in a language that she has not studied in high school is not required to take the placement exam.

I speak English. Why should I learn another language?

“...[E]ffective communication and successful negotiations with a foreign partner — whether with a partner in peacekeeping, a strategic economic partner, a political adversary, or a non-English speaking contact in a critical law enforcement action — requires strong comprehension of the underlying cultural values and belief structures that are part of the life experience of the foreign partner.”
— Dr. Dan Davidson, President of the American Councils on International Education

“A different language is a different vision of life.”
— Federico Fellini, Italian film director

The knowledge of other languages and cultures is becoming more and more necessary in today’s globalized world, representing skills increasingly sought by employers both within and outside the United States, particularly for higher-level positions. Additionally, the ability to understand and communicate in another language and across cultures can lead to significant personal growth, both intellectually and spiritually, developing critical and interpretive thinking. (Some studies show a meaningful correlation between second language study and improved verbal and mathematical performance on tests such as the SAT or the MCAT.) Studying a second language can also open doors to self-knowledge and to participation in worlds you haven’t yet imagined.

Introductory Level. These courses are for students who have never studied the language or those who are continuing a language studied in high school and earned a score below 38 on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students who have earned high school credits in a language will not be allowed to enroll in the introductory level sequence (101) or the intermediate level sequence (111) of that language until they have taken the online placement exam.

MLAR 101Introductory Arabic I4
MLAR 102Introductory Arabic II4
MLCH 101Introductory Mandarin Chinese I4
MLCH 102Introductory Mandarin Chinese II4
MLFR 101Introductory French I4
MLFR 102Introductory French II4
MLGR 101Introductory German I4
MLGR 102Introductory German II4
MLIT 101Introductory Italian I4
MLIT 102Introductory Italian II4
MLSP 101Introductory Spanish I4
MLSP 102Introductory Spanish II4

Intermediate Level. These courses are for students who are continuing a language studied in high school and who demonstrate sufficient language competence to pursue intermediate study of the language with an emphasis on written and oral expression. Placement at the intermediate level will be determined by the Department of Modern Languages based on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students earning a score of 38 or higher must enroll at the intermediate level. Students who have earned high school credits in a language will not be allowed to enroll in the introductory level sequence (101) or the intermediate level sequence (111) of that language until they have taken the online placement exam.

MLFR 111Intermediate French I4
MLFR 112Intermediate French II4
MLGR 111Intermediate German I4
MLGR 112Intermediate German II4
MLIT 111Intermediate Italian4
MLSP 111Intermediate Spanish I4
MLSP 112Intermediate Spanish II4
MLSP 115Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers I4
MLSP 116Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers II4

Placement and Credit

The decision regarding which foreign language to study and whether to continue or begin a new language belongs to the student. First- year advisors will help a student weigh her interests and consider her ability, study abroad and career plans in order to advise her and help her reach a thoughtful decision.

The placement exam can be a helpful tool in the advising process. A student electing to continue the study of a foreign language  for which she has received high school credit must complete the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam before she will be allowed to enroll in either the introductory or the intermediate level.

The level in which the student enrolls may have an impact on her choice of study abroad programs or her ability to major in a particular language. The first-year advisor can provide all pertinent information, but the student and her academic advisor are encouraged to consult with the chair of modern languages if there are any questions.

Eight credits in modern languages are awarded upon completion of the requirement. Students who complete the requirement at the intermediate level (111–112 or 115–116) will receive an additional four semester hours of elective credit.

Recommendations:

  1. In deciding how to fulfill the modern languages requirement in the Sophia Program, the department encourages students to base their decision on their personal interests, taking into consideration their study abroad and career plans, as well as their linguistic ability. Students should discuss this decision with their first year advisor.
  2. A student starting a new language should complete the Sophia modern language requirement before the beginning of her junior year.
  3. A student wishing to major in Spanish or minor in French or Italian with no prior study of that language must enroll in the introductory level in her first year.
  4. Students may be exempt from the foreign language requirement by examination. Refer to pages 43–44.

Arabic

MLAR 101  Introductory Arabic I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Arabic language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Arabic and Islamic cultures. Strongly recommended for prospective students of the Morocco program. Students who have earned high school credits in Arabic enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

Chinese

MLCH 101  Introductory Mandarin Chinese I  (4)  

This two semester sequence is an introduction to Mandarin Chinese for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Chinese culture. Strongly recommended for prospective students of Saint Mary’s China Summer Program and China Semester Programs in Shanghai and Nanjing. Required for participation in the Nanjing, China Program. Students who have earned high school credits in Mandarin Chinese enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

French

MLFR 101  Introductory French I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the French language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to French and Francophone cultures. Strongly recommended for study abroad in Morocco. Students who have earned high school credits in French enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLFR 111  Intermediate French I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in French focusing on all four skills: speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on French and Francophone cultures. Students enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

German

MLGR 101  Introductory German I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the German language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Germanic cultures. Strongly recommended for students interested in the English language program in Innsbruck, Austria. Students who have earned high school credits in German enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLGR 111  Intermediate German I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in German focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Germanic cultures. MLGR 111 - MLGR 112 is required for participation in the immersion study abroad program in Innsbruck, Austria. Students enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

Italian

MLIT 101  Introductory Italian I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Italian language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Italian culture. Strongly recommended for prospective students of the Rome Program. Students who have earned high school credits in Italian enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices and LO3 Global Learning A.

MLIT 111  Intermediate Italian  (4)  

This course is a continuation of MLIT 101 - MLIT 102 and is designed to develop an intermediate proficiency in Italian focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Italian culture. Prerequisite: MLIT 102 or equivalent, or the requisite score on the Italian placement exam, or permission of the department. Strongly recommended but not required for study in Rome.

Designed to develop an intermediate level proficiency in Italian focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Italian culture. Placement into this level is determined by the student’s score on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students earning a score of 38 or above must enroll in the intermediate sequence. The Modern Language Sophia requirement can be fulfilled with a second approved Italian language course.

Spanish

MLSP 101  Introductory Spanish I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is an introduction to the Spanish language for students with no or limited previous study of the language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The sequence also introduces students to Hispanic cultures. Students who have earned high school credits in Spanish enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLSP 111  Intermediate Spanish I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Hispanic cultures. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and MLSP 111 - MLSP 112 or MLSP 115 - MLSP 116 is required for study abroad in Cordoba, Argentina. Students enroll in this sequence on the basis of a placement exam.

MLSP 115  Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers I  (4)  

This two-semester sequence is designed to develop an intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, but with increased attention given to reading, writing, and grammar, as appropriate to heritage speakers. Emphasis is also placed on Hispanic cultures. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and MLSP 111 - MLSP 112 or MLSP 115 - MLSP 116 is required for study abroad in Cordoba, Argentina. Only heritage speakers who receive the requisite score on the Spanish placement exam may enroll in this sequence.

Traditions and Worldviews

Philosophical Worldviews

PHIL 110  Introductory Philosophy  (3)  

Readings and discussions designed to introduce the student to the major areas and problems of philosophy through a study of the writings of classical and contemporary thinkers. (4 semester hours when taught as writing proficiency). There are no prerequisites for this course.

Section 72338 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

PHIL 110  Introductory Philosophy  (3)  

Readings and discussions designed to introduce the student to the major areas and problems of philosophy through a study of the writings of classical and contemporary thinkers. (4 semester hours when taught as writing proficiency). There are no prerequisites for this course.

This discussion-based course introduces the student to philosophy, specifically focusing on questions that have interested human beings across time. What can I know about the world around me? What does it mean to live a good life? How should I treat others? We will look at how historical thinkers have addressed these questions and consider how philosophy can help the contemporary student reflect on how to live a good life. This section will include enrichment materials to help the student reflect on her skills, passions, and future vocation. This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar, an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Social Responsibility A. Section 72339 is an exploratory course linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

A unit of the tandem The Art of Living, taken in conjunction with ART 211W Ceramics: Introduction to Clay. Both ceramics and philosophy are arts. The ceramicist, as artist, reaches for a deeper understanding of her medium. Her aim is to realize the potentials in clay through the creation of artifacts that — perhaps more frequently than those produced in any other of the fine arts — can be integrated and actually used as part of daily life, making that life richer, more meaningful, and whole. The philosopher, likewise, reaches for a deeper understanding of her medium, in this case, life itself, exploring what it might mean to live a life that is rich and meaningful. In this tandem we will creatively read our way through some highlights of Western philosophical attempts to discover what goes into fashioning a meaningful life. Along the way, we will discuss the abstract nature of beauty and creativity, learning what we can from the very concrete activity of bringing forth aesthetically satisfying meaning in the studio through both hand building and throwing on the wheel. Assignments in one class will in many cases connect directly to those in the other, allowing us plenty of opportunity for exploring the connections between these two challenging and engaging disciplines. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W and satisfy an LO2 Women’s Voices.

PHIL 247  Philosophy of Religion  (3)  

An investigation of the major philosophical issues in religious thought as posed by both critics and advocates. Special attention is paid to the relation between religious faith and knowledge. There are no prerequisites to this course.

PHIL 253  Philosophy of Politics  (3)  

A study of theories of society and the state which may include classical, contemporary, feminist, or ethnic visions of real and ideal community. There are no pre-requisites to this course.

Religious Traditions

RLST 101  Introducing Religious Studies  (3)  

This course introduces students to the study of religion and theological inquiry. Through a variety of sources it explores the meaning of religion in personal and cultural life.

RLST 101  Introducing Religious Studies  (3)  

This course introduces students to the study of religion and theological inquiry. Through a variety of sources it explores the meaning of religion in personal and cultural life.

This course is an introduction to the subject of conversion. It will focus on the following question. Why does an individual leave one set of beliefs for another? How does this take place? What are the practical consequences for the new believer? How does a conversion change the convert’s relationship to the world around him or her? With these questions in mind, we will begin by reading texts that define conversion in academic terms and then apply those terms to fictional and non-fictional case studies, specifically the memoir of A.J. Jacobs, the biography of Malcolm X, and the novels of Ayad Akhtar and George Saunders.

RLST 101  Introducing Religious Studies  (3)  

This course introduces students to the study of religion and theological inquiry. Through a variety of sources it explores the meaning of religion in personal and cultural life.

This course introduces students to the study of religion and theological inquiry. Through a variety of sources, it explores the meaning of religion in personal and cultural life. In this course, we attend to notions of God; the human person, relationships and community; the good life and ethics; and revelation in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We consider how these three religious traditions respond to questions such as: Who am I? Whose am I? Who is God? How ought we to live? From there, we turn to the relationship between theological ideas and religious experiences. We attend to plurality and change. In the end, we focus on the experiences of women in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

RLST 101  Introducing Religious Studies  (3)  

This course introduces students to the study of religion and theological inquiry. Through a variety of sources it explores the meaning of religion in personal and cultural life.

This course will broaden students’ understanding of the nature and complexities of religion and allow them to gain an understanding how religion interacts with other aspects of culture by examining the worldviews, beliefs, practices, symbols, and social formations of GrecoRoman religions, Second Temple Judaism, and Pauline Christianity. The course is divided into three sections devoted to each of these three religious traditions. As this occurs, students will explore each religion’s capacity to provide meaning to life, while considering their potential to challenge and transform individuals and societies. Topics such as God/gods, myth, cosmology, evil, sickness, suffering, death, afterlife, ethics, ritual, love, mysticism/prayer, and community will be addressed. The study of these religious ideas and expressions will be done by reading ancient writings and contemporary secondary texts. Early Christianity will be encountered through the mission and writings of Paul the Apostle. While studying Greco-Roman religions, Second Temple Judaism, and Pauline Christianity and the cultural norms within which these three religions thrived, the course will also highlight similar and/or divergent religious ideas from contemporary American popular culture to show similarities and differences from contemporary cultural practices and beliefs. Students will consider how these ancient religions’ search for meaning, particularly Christianity’s, is still relevant to humanity’s search for meaning today. The ancient world in which these three religions thrived, much like ours today, was a world full of dramatic changes, rapid development, increased urbanization, potential prosperity, and potential danger. Thus, students will gain an understanding of how these three ancient religions helped people to cope with all of the challenges of ancient life and to feel at home in the cosmos.

RLST 101  Introducing Religious Studies  (3)  

This course introduces students to the study of religion and theological inquiry. Through a variety of sources it explores the meaning of religion in personal and cultural life.

How can learning about religion help us understand others and ourselves? This writing-intensive course will explore that question as we gain a sound basic understanding of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, and the nature of religion. We’ll take four main approaches. First, we’ll practice scholarly tools that will help us understand religions, others, and ourselves better. Second, we’ll learn some of the major concepts that make these religions distinctive, and perhaps make them similar as well. Third, we’ll study different kinds of religious texts, from the ancient Hindu epic The Ramayana to a contemporary documentary about rebirth in Tibetan Buddhism. Finally, we’ll examine the diverse, changing ways these religions are lived today, including in interreligious dialogue, and we’ll examine how religions are portrayed in contemporary media. Throughout, we’ll practice skills in critical thinking and oral and written communication. This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and LO3 Intercultural Competence A and B.

How can learning about religion help us understand others and ourselves? This writing-intensive course will explore that question as we gain a sound basic understanding of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, and the nature of religion. We’ll take four main approaches. First, we’ll practice scholarly tools that will help us understand religions, others, and ourselves better. Second, we’ll learn some of the major concepts that make these religions distinctive and perhaps make them similar as well. Third, we’ll study different kinds of religious texts, from the ancient Hindu epic The Ramayana to a contemporary documentary about rebirth in Tibetan Buddhism. Finally, we’ll examine the diverse, changing ways these religions are lived today, including in interreligious dialogue, and we’ll examine how religions are portrayed in contemporary media. Students will also have the opportunity to develop skills needed for college-level and professional writing, and each student will create a portfolio of her work to submit for LO2: Basic Writing Competence. This course also satisfies LO3 Intercultural Competence A and B and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

Historical Perspectives

ART 241  Art History Survey I  (3)  

This course provides a survey of the historical development of Western and non­Western art and architecture beginning with the Neolithic period and leading up to the thirteenth century. We will study works of art in their cultural contexts in order to gain an understanding of the purpose, meaning, and significance of works of art to those who made and used them. Emphasis will be placed on the exchange of knowledge, ideas, forms, and iconography across cultures over time, and the subsequent change in the meaning and significance of these when put to new uses in new contexts. We will discuss current issues and debates in art history, such as responsible collection practices and repatriation of art objects. We will relate the aesthetic experiences and values of cultures from our period of study to contemporary culture. Over the course of the semester, students will develop their own analysis of the purpose, meaning, and significance of a single art object that they have viewed in a museum, and which dates from the chronological period the course covers.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Global Learning B.

ENVS 161  Introduction to Environmental Studies  (3)  

An interdisciplinary course on the systemic interaction of human beings with their environments. It identifies interests informing environmental decisions and introduces practices of environmental advocacy.

This course also satisfies LO3 Global Learning B and LO3 Social Responsibility B.

ENVS 203  Sustainability at Saint Mary’s College and in the Holy Cross Charism  (2)  

This course will address sustainability in the context of the local academic community and its institutions. In light of the recent papal encyclical, Laudato si, On Care for Our Common Home, this course will provide students an opportunity to explore in an interdisciplinary way the challenges of sustainability and develop collaborative strategies for making our common campus homes more sustainable. This course will be offered concurrently at ND, SMC, and HCC, and will be co-taught by faculty from all three campuses. It will meet in rotation on each of the three campuses once per week for two hours. Students will be invited to examine the course materials in conversation with the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross through immersion at each of the campuses and encounters with the sisters, brothers, and priests of Holy Cross and with sustainability professionals.

This course satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility A and B but does not fulfill an LO1 requirement. 

GWS 207  Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies  (3)  

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the field of gender and women’s studies. The course will enable students to understand how gender impacts their everyday lives, social institutions, and cultural practices both locally and globally. Additionally, students will examine the significance and meaning of one’s gender identity in different historical periods, the history of feminist movements, and transnational perspectives on feminism. Students will also discuss how gender intersects with other identity categories such as socioeconomic class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, age, geography, and generational location. Lastly, students will examine and critique cultural representations and claims about women and gender identities.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

HUST 197  Myth, Legend, and History  (1-3)  

This course studies the ways people talk about their past through myths, legends, and history by focusing on subjects such as the Trojan War, King Arthur, Joan of Arc, and the sinking of the Titanic, among others.

This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar, an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Global Learning A and LO3 Social Responsibility A. This course is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Global Learning A, LO3 Social Responsibility A and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ICS 201  Introduction to Intercultural Studies  (3)  

An introduction to Intercultural Studies through an examination of 1) the relationship between culture and identity, 2) patterns of behavior and attitudes engendered by intercultural contact, 3) systems of power and privilege, and 4) expressions of identity. The course emphasizes the necessity of intercultural skills in the pluralistic society of the United States in the 21st century. It also fosters an understanding of different perspectives through the study of texts which voice the viewpoints and histories of various identity groups within the United States.

This course also satisfies LO3 Intercultural Competence A and B.

This course also satisfies LO3 Intercultural Competence A and B and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

MUS 243  Latin American and Latino Popular Music  (3)  

The term Popular Music in Latin-America describes several dozen different musical styles originated or related to Latin America, the Caribbean and the Latino Population in the US. This course is an introduction to Latin American popular music through a survey that will provide a broad and comprehensive panorama on these styles. We will talk about the main composers and performers, geographical location, history as well as cultural and sociopolitical backgrounds of each style. In addition to that we will address lyrics and musical characteristics such as instrumentation and rhythmic patterns of selected musical examples to shape our understanding of the music. Students from all disciplines may take the course. No prior knowledge of music, Spanish or Portuguese is required.

This course also satisfies LO3 Global Learning A and B, and LO3 Intercultural Competence A and B. (FILLED)

MUS 244  History of Rock ‘n’ Roll  (3)  

A survey of the development of Rock ‘n’ Roll music, its major figures, and interaction with society, culture, technology, and business.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Social Responsibility A, and LO3 Intercultural Competence A.

Science for the Citizen

Natural Sciences

This non-majors course is built on the following themes: the cell, energy, information, and integration. Where possible, we will identify individuals and evaluate the contributions that led to major advances in our understanding of these processes and identify the questions that remain unanswered. Throughout the course we will stop to address the relevance of the processes under consideration to life choices and/or current issues facing our communities. Three hours of lecture and a two-hour lab each week. Note: $50 lab fee applies. 

BIO 141  Human Anatomy and Physiology I  (4)  

This course is the first of a two- part sequence for the intended nursing major that will cover the chemical basis of cells, cell microscopy, and tissue types as well as the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system (including special senses). Course content will also include discussions about health/disease issues of concern as they pertain to the current course material. Laboratory content will include use of the scientific method as well as acquisition and application of knowledge pertaining to physiological processes as discussed in lecture. This class meets the NS LO1 Sophia Program Liberal Learning designations. Offered fall semester for first year intended nursing majors; 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab per week; no prerequisites

Note: $50 lab fee applies. For nursing intended majors.

BIO 155  Foundations of Molecular Biology  (2)  

A survey of foundational concepts in biology, with a focus on molecular biology. Part of the introductory Foundations of Biology courses for biology majors, but available to non majors as well. This course will cover an introduction to biochemistry, the organic molecules important for life, and classical Mendelian and modern genetics. A half semester course that must be taken with a lab. Two Foundation courses must be completed to complete Sophia learning outcomes.

Note: $25 lab fee applies. For biology and chemistry intended majors. Two Foundation courses must be completed to fulfill Sophia learning outcomes.

BIO 156  Foundations of Ecology and Evolution  (2)  

A survey of foundational concepts in biology, with a focus on ecology and evolution. Part of the introductory Biology Foundations courses for biology majors, but available to non majors as well. This course will cover how organisms interact with one another and their environment, the dynamic functioning of ecosystem, the origin and diversification of life on Earth, and the evolutionary forces that shape patterns of biodiversity within populations and across lineages. A half semester course that must be taken with a lab. Two foundation courses must be completed to complete Sophia learning outcomes.

Note: $25 lab fee applies. For biology and chemistry intended majors. Two Foundation courses must be completed to fulfill Sophia learning outcomes.

CHEM 121  Principles of Chemistry I  (4)  

This course is an introduction to chemical stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, and bonding. Laboratory will explore principles presented in lecture. (Three-hour lecture and one three-hour laboratory). Prerequisite: high school chemistry or permission of the instructor; students must be calculus-ready. For biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering intended majors. This course also satisfies the LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar.

Note: $50 lab fee appliesThis course also satisfies the LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar. Lab section 72469 is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

PHYS 121  General Physics I: Mechanics and Waves  (4)  

An introduction to mechanics, and waves. This is the first semester of a two-part calculus-based physics sequence designed for students in science, math, and engineering. (Three hours of lecture and two hours laboratory.) Prerequisite: either MATH 131, MATH 132, or MATH 133. (High school physics strongly recommended)

Designed for students in science, math, and engineering and taken in the spring semester.

Social Science I 

ANTH 253  Survey I: Culture and Language  (3)  

A survey of sociocultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics. The course takes a comparative approach to the study of culture. Topics include: family, kinship, and marriage; cultural ecology and economics; political organization; gender roles and socialization; religion and ritual; and culture change. Basic concepts, methods of research, and analytic perspectives are introduced.

This course also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility A, LO3 Global Learning A and B, and LO3 Intercultural Competence A.

POSC 151  Political Issues  (3)  

An analysis of various political ideas, systems, issues, and/or phenomena designed to introduce students to political thinking.

This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar.

POSC 201  American Politics  (3)  

This course serves as an introductory survey of the major principles, institutions, processes, functions, and behavioral patterns of the American political system. It helps students to develop a broad, diverse, and articulate base of knowledge and understanding of American politics and government.

PSYC 156  Introduction to Psychology: Culture and Systems  (3)  

An introductory survey of theories, topics, and applications in psychology. Course covers a wide range of classic and contemporary topics in psychology, including brain and behavior, thinking and intelligence, and psychological disorders. The 156 course is organized around systems of thought and social science concepts that identify biological, psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, and sociocultural approaches to psychological topics. Students will recognize the impact of human diversity, and learn that psychological explanations vary across populations and contexts. A student cannot earn credit for both PSYC 156 and PSYC 157.

SOC 255  Race, Ethnicity, and Identity in the United States  (3)  

This course assesses the social, political, historical, and demographic outcomes of intergroup relations in the United States. Dominant-minority relations are analyzed in relation to the other. Particular focus is given to past and current social policy and dimensions of social inequality.

This course also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility A and LO3 Intercultural Competence A. Section 72480 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

SOC 257  Sociology of Families  (3)  

This course will examine family life through the lens of the sociological perspective. Students will study topics such as family roles, mate selection, marriage, and divorce. Contemporary issues facing families such as balancing work and family, parenting, aging, and abuse will be explored. Additionally, students will examine how families are shaped by economics, politics, and culture. Finally, students will consider how families reflect inequalities of gender, sexuality, race, and class.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Social Responsibility A , and LO3 Intercultural Competence A.

Social Science II 

ECON 251  Principles of Macroeconomics  (3)  

Economic principles relating to the functioning of the aggregate economy, including the fundamentals of national income measurement and determination, money and banking, fiscal and monetary policies and economic growth.

This is a required course for accounting, business administration, economics and global studies majors.

ECON 252  Principles of Microeconomics  (3)  

Economic principles relating to the determination of prices and output under competition, monopoly and other market structures. The theory of consumer demand, analysis of the cost structure of the firm, pricing and employment of resources, and distribution of income.

This is a required course for business and economics majors. Section 72521 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

PSYC 157  Introduction to Psychology: Science for the Citizen  (3)  

An introductory survey of theories, topics and applications in psychology. Courses cover a wide range of classic and contemporary topics in psychology, including brain and behavior, thinking and intelligence, and psychological disorders. The 157 course emphasizes social science methodology and, therefore, students will conduct basic studies to address psychological questions using appropriate research methods. A student cannot earn credit for both PSYC 156 and PSYC 157.

Sections 73126 and 73127 also satisfy LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar.

SOC 153  Sociological Imaginations  (3)  

A general survey of the basic concepts and processes necessary for an understanding of society, culture, groups, institutions, and social behavior. The applications of the discipline are emphasized to encourage the student to appreciate the utility of the sociological approach.

This course also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility A and LO3 Intercultural Competence A.

SOC 203  Social Problems  (3)  

This course focuses on some of the phenomena which have been identified as social problems in the United States. Among the issues discussed are poverty, gender and racial stratification, hyper-consumerism, changing family structures, inequality in the educational system, health care issues, the work environment, drug abuse, and crime. Particular attention will be given to the role of the social structure in the creation and perpetuation of social problems, and how social problems are interrelated.

This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar, LO3 Global Learning B, and LO3 Social Responsibility A.

Arts for Living

Creative and Performing Arts

ART 101  Drawing I  (3)  

This is a broad foundation course that introduces a variety of drawing techniques, approaches and subject matter. A focus on observational drawing improves the student's ability to "see" (visual perception) and develops technical drawing skills. Projects are designed to enhance the understanding and use of formal elements, principles and composition while exploring drawing's creative and expressive potential. Subject matter includes still life, landscape, interiors, and the figure. Studio projects are augmented by critiques, visual presentations and discussion. Sketchbook/journal required.

ART 103  Design Lab  (3)  

This course will introduce you to the basic formal elements and organizing principles of two-, three-, and four-dimensional design. The course is designed to expose students to the basic formal considerations, material properties, technical skills, and working methods of image and object making in conjunction with idea-based problem solving. Likewise, students will be introduced to themes and practices related to contemporary art and design through course handouts, lectures, presentations, and discussion.

As a Critical Thinking Seminar-designated course (or CTS), students will critically analyze and discuss the power of design solutions (images, objects, interactivity) in light of design components (form, composition, balance, shape, space, color, for example). This course foregrounds the process of design in a variety of ways, namely through creative projects. You’ll create your design solutions through a combination of form and content, and in a variety of contexts. In other words, you will integrate visual information with meaning or message, in a presentation method. Your creative work will always be discussed in light of, and at times be presented to, the general public or an audience. What can your audience learn about the world through your design work? How do they learn it? What can (or will) they do as a result of what they’re learning? This course also satisfies the LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar.

ART 125  Silkscreen  (3)  

Introduction to the various methods of serigraphy, with exploration of color, tone and texture as the natural result of the process.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

ART 205  Painting: Oil  (3)  

This course consists of a series of paint ing assignments that introduces the stu dent to the idiom and use of oil paints. The student will begin developing a facility in manipulating and using the materials and techniques of oils, and by the end of the course, the student will be expected to visually express her unique vision and ideas with this medium. Regular private and group critiques.

ART 211  Ceramics: Introduction to Clay  (3)  

An introductory course in basic ceramic techniques and creative processes that use clay as an expressive medium through hand building, throwing on the potter’s wheel, and glazing/finishing.

A unit of the tandem The Art of Living, taken in conjunction with PHIL 110W Introduction to Philosophy. Both ceramics and philosophy are arts. The ceramicist, as artist, reaches for a deeper understanding of her medium. Her aim is to realize the potentials in clay through the creation of artifacts that — perhaps more frequently than those produced in any other of the fine arts — can be integrated and actually used as part of daily life, making that life richer, more meaningful, and whole. The philosopher, likewise, reaches for a deeper understanding of her medium, in this case, life itself, exploring what it might mean to live a life that is rich and meaningful. In this tandem we will creatively read our way through some highlights of Western philosophical attempts to discover what goes into fashioning a meaningful life. Along the way, we will discuss the abstract nature of beauty and creativity, learning what we can from the very concrete activity of bringing forth aesthetically satisfying meaning in the studio through both hand building and throwing on the wheel. Assignments in one class will in many cases connect directly to those in the other, allowing us plenty of opportunity for exploring the connections between these two challenging and engaging disciplines. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ART 221  Photography I  (3)  

Introductory black and white photography. Students study the basic elements necessary for control in the exposure, development and printing of photographic materials. Initial exploration of the medium stresses consideration of its visual and aesthetic dimensions through a creative problem­solving approach. (Variable shutter/aperture camera required).

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

ART 224  Video Art  (3)  

This course introduces the medium of video as an art form and will explore, in theory and practice, issues of space, time and action. Proficiencies in camera use, storyboarding, lighting, digital editing and presentation will be developed. The use of video for artistic expression will be supported by readings and the viewing and discussion of works by video artists.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

COMM 103  Introduction to Communication  (3)  

Students develop an increased competency in communicating with precision and style, and also have the opportunity to think critically and creatively about the process of communication. Major topics in communication theory and practice are surveyed in addition to a focus on public speaking.

Section 73103 also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

Essentially, students in COMM 103W Introduction to Communications explore one central question: What is human communication? While it is true that humans use verbal “message-and-response” interchanges, we will discover that communication is a sophisticated, ongoing process. This will lead us to other questions: When and where does human communication occur? How has it shaped centuries of human development? What makes us choose one form of communication — email, text messages, etc. — over another? What are the effects of each medium of communication on the quality of our messages?

This section of COMM 103W Introduction to Communications  also stresses intrapersonal communication — the messages we send to ourselves. In this aspect of the course, we’ll explore options that will assist you in discerning your college major choice and life vocation. Finally, you’ll study and practice various techniques to achieve college-level proficiency in writing. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W. This is an exploratory course linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

Multiple dance courses may be used to satisfy this requirement as long as they add up to at least three credit hours. Students receive two credits for technique courses taken for the first time and one credit for subsequent enrollment in the same level technique course.

DANC 145  Ballet Technique: Beginning  (1,2)  

An introduction to basic ballet technique and terminology. Designed for students with no previous movement training. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 148  Jazz Technique: Beginning  (1,2)  

A practical course in contemporary jazz technique hip hop and lyrical styles. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 240  Introduction to Dance  (3)  

This course surveys western and non-western dance forms through lecture and studio format. Movement characteristics are linked to cultural identity through the function of dance. Folk, social, and theatrical dance forms will be explored. In addition, Motif (basic movement notation) reading and writing will be introduced at an elementary level and used as a tool for movement identification and creative exploration. This course is intended to foster the student’s personal aesthetics and appreciation of dance.

DANC 244  Modern Dance Technique: Intermediate  (1,2)  

A course exploring various approaches to technique, with emphasis on the concepts of weight, space, time and flow. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 245  Ballet Technique: Intermediate  (1,2)  

Ballet technique at the intermediate level emphasizing correct alignment and proper execution of barre and center exercises. Prerequisite: placement audition. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 248  Jazz Technique: Intermediate  (1,2)  

Jazz technique at a more advanced level including hip hop and lyrical styles, with an emphasis on performance. Prerequisite: placement audition. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 344  Modern Dance Technique: Advanced  (1,2)  

A more advanced technique course with an emphasis on technical execution and artistic expression. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 345  Ballet Technique: Advanced  (1,2)  

Ballet technique for the advanced level student emphasizing accuracy, style, intricate combinations, strength, endurance and advanced vocabulary. Prerequisite: DANC 245 or placement audition. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 348  Jazz Technique: Advanced  (1-2)  

A continuation of jazz technique providing a stimulating and rigorous application of both the traditional jazz dance vocabulary and contemporary styles. The course prepares the dancer for complex group and solo work for concert performance, video, and musical theatre. Prerequisite: DANC 248 and placement audition. May be repeated for credit.

MUS 104  Class Guitar  (1)  

Group guitar instruction for those beginning the instrument and/or interested in using the guitar as a teaching aid.

See description below under Applied Music.

MUS 111  Piano  (1,2)  

Piano Private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 112  Organ  (1,2)  

Organ private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 113  Harpsichord  (1,2)  

Harpsichord private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 114  Voice  (1,2)  

Voice private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 115  Violin  (1,2)  

Violin private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 116  Viola  (1,2)  

Viola private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 117  Cello  (1,2)  

Cello private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 118  Double Bass  (1,2)  

Double Bass private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 119  Percussion  (1,2)  

Percussion private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 120  Flute  (1,2)  

Flute private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 121  Oboe  (1,2)  

Oboe private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 122  Clarinet  (1,2)  

Clarinet private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 123  Bassoon  (1,2)  

Bassoon private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Each private music lessons has fees.

MUS 124  Saxophone  (1,2)  

Saxophone private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Private music lessons have fees.

MUS 125  Trumpet  (1,2)  

Trumpet private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Private music lessons have fees.

MUS 126  French Horn  (1,2)  

French Horn private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Private music lessons have fees.

MUS 127  Trombone  (1,2)  

Trombone private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Private music lessons have fees

MUS 128  Baritone Horn  (1,2)  

Baritone Horn private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Private music lessons have fees

MUS 129  Tuba  (1,2)  

Tuba private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Private music lessons have fees.

MUS 130  Harp  (1,2)  

Harp private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Private music lessons have fees.

MUS 131  Guitar  (1,2)  

Guitar private lessons. Prerequisite for all 2-credit private lessons:Music major or Permission of instructor. There are 50-minute private lesson each week or 30-minute private lesson each week. Private music lessons have fees.

There is no fee for Class Guitar.

For information on Class Piano, String Ensemble, and Concert Band see page 31.

MUS 181  Theory I: Fundamentals of Music  (3)  

Theory 1 is for students at the beginning of their theory studies - those with an incomplete grasp of the fundamentals of music. It is a study of the organizational principles inherent in pitch and rhythm, with an emphasis on the notation and analysis of these in written symbols. Both conceptual understanding and facility in use are developed in such areas as clefs, octave designation, intervals, triads, inversion, tonality, transposition, harmonic motion and harmonization, motives, and simple form. Elementary singing, piano, and conducting skills are developed in order to strengthen understanding of the principles of music. Theory 1 is required for the music major and minor.

Music Ensemble

Students may enroll for ensemble courses that offer one hour of credit per semester. Auditions are required before acceptance into any of the choral ensembles. After you arrive on campus, sign up for an audition appointment in Moreau Hall, Room 309. If you are selected for one of the groups, you may add the course to your schedule at the Academic Affairs and First Year Studies office.

MUS 201  Collegiate Choir  (1)  

A women’s choir that performs primarily on campus. Goals include developing excellent individual and group tone quality, working toward clear and proper diction, and strengthening aural and music reading abilities. Performs quality women’s repertoire, both sacred and secular, in 2 to 4 parts.

MUS 203  Women's Choir  (1)  

The College’s select women’s ensemble. Performs music of all periods with an emphasis on new music. Regularly commissions and records new works. National concert tours every other year. Regular performances with the South Bend Symphony Orchestra. Hosts the annual High School Women’s Choir Festival.

THTR 135  Introduction to Theatre  (3)  

A broad and comprehensive view of theatre and how it communicates. Fulfills the fine arts requirements.

THTR 205  Introduction to Acting  (3)  

Exploration of the elements of a realistic acting technique using games, improvisations and exercises, culminating in two-character scenes later in the semester.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

Professional Arts

SLP 220  Introduction to Communicative Disorders  (3)  

A study of the causes, characteristics, and treatments of speech, language, and hearing disorders. Course content also includes speech and language development and suggestions for living and working with those who have communicative disorders.

This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Social Responsibility A, LO3 Academic Experiential Learning and is linked to a first-year faculty advisor.

SW 202  Introduction to Social Work  (3)  

This course is an introduction to the knowledge and skills of the generalist practice of social work. It includes an examination of the history, principles, practice, research, and literature in the social welfare field. Theoretical and professional foundations, diverse client systems, areas of practice, contemporary social policies, and social work values are examined. The student is given opportunities to dialogue with community agency representatives.

This course is excellent preparation for entry into any field, taught by faculty who have experience in the field, and also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Social Responsibility A and B. Section 72833 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and LO3 Academic Experiential Learning.

SW 235  Human Behavior and the Social Environment I  (3)  

This course examines human behavior and the social environment using the generalist social work theoretical framework to explain the interactions of individuals, families, and groups. Special emphasis is given to the biological, social, psychological, and cultural factors that affect human behavior within these micro and mezzo systems.

This course is excellent preparation for entry into any field, taught by faculty who have experience in the field, and also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility A and B.

Mathematical Arts

If you wish to select a mathematics course for the first semester, the following courses are offered. Suggestions for the appropriate course according to high school background, aptitude, interests, and performance on the math placement test are given with each description. The placement test is required for all incoming students and must be completed before registering for the fall semester.

This information should be used to select an appropriate course. Each student will receive a math placement recommendation based on her scores and experience. Any student who wishes to take a more advanced course than is recommended or who has concerns about placement should contact the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science via the following email: mathplacement@saintmarys. edu. In this email, include your scores, your academic background (performance in math classes in high school), and your intended major (if you have one).

Course Math Placement Score Math SAT Math ACT Min. # of Years of Math in High School AP Calculus AB Exam
100 20 or less 460 or less 18 or less 3 N/A
102 21-26 470-520 19-23 3 N/A
103 25-35 490-560 21-25 3 N/A
104 26-34 530-570 23-26 3 N/A
105 30-38 540-600 24-27 4 N/A
131 36-44 570 or better 26 or better 4 3 or less
132 40 or better 600 or better 28 or better 4 3 or better
133 44 or better 630 or better 29 or better 4 4 or better

Please note that students whose basic mathematics problem solving skills need to be stronger (as shown by previous academic background and performance on the placement test) must take MATH 100 Problem-Solving Strategies in Mathematics. Students wishing to enroll in a calculus course (MATH 105 Elements of Calculus I, MATH 131 Calculus I) and who need more preparation (as shown by previous academic background and performance on the math placement test) must successfully complete MATH 103 Precalculus before enrolling in a calculus course.

MATH 100Problem-Solving Strategies in Mathematics3

This course is an intensive study of the problem solving process. Algebraic, patterning, modeling, and geometric strategies are explored. This course does not fulfill a Sophia Program requirement in mathematical arts but is required for students whose basic mathematics problem solving skills need to be stronger for college- level work. This is required for students with three or four years of high school math who meet any one of the following: Math SAT score of 460 or less, Math ACT score of 18 or less, or math placement test score of 20 or less. This course does not fulfill the Sophia Program requirement in Mathematical Arts. This course is offered only in the fall semester.

MATH 102  Liberal Arts Mathematics  (3)  

Mathematical modeling through the use of graph theory. Topics include graphs, directed graphs, trees, matchings and network flows. Designed primarily for first year college students. Prerequisite: MATH 100 or recommendation of Math Placement Advisor.

MATH 103  Precalculus  (3)  

This course studies polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions from the symbolic, numeric, and graphical perspectives. The emphasis on these concepts will provide solid preparation for a college-level calculus course. This does not fulfill the Mathematical Arts requirement of the Sophia Program. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or recommendation of Math Placement Advisor.

This course does not fulfill the Sophia Program requirement in Mathematical Arts. This course is offered only in the fall semester.

MATH 104  Finite Mathematics  (3)  

Set theory, counting techniques, probability, random variables, expected value, variance, standard deviation, and linear programming. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or recommendation of Math Placement Advisor.

MATH 105  Elements of Calculus I  (3)  

Introduction to differential and integral calculus designed primarily for liberal arts students and those in the professional programs. Limits are treated intuitively. Emphasis on applications.

This course is offered only in the fall semester.

MATH 131  Calculus I  (4)  

Algebraic and transcendental functions; limits; continuity; derivatives; maxima and minima; concavity; related rates; Taylor polynomials; Mean Value Theorem; anti-differentiation; Riemann sums; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; techniques of integration; sequences and series. The course is based on graphical, numerical, and symbolic points of view. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: At least four years of high school mathematics.

Note: There is a problem session offered for this course every Wednesday at the same time as the class is taught on Mondays. The problem session is optional, but it is highly recommended that a student keep this time free in her schedule so that she may attend the problem session.

MATH 132  Calculus II  (4)  

Algebraic and transcendental functions; limits; continuity; derivatives; maxima and minima; concavity; related rates; Taylor polynomials; Mean Value Theorem; anti-differentiation; Riemann sums; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; techniques of integration; sequences and series. The course is based on graphical, numerical, and symbolic points of view. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: At least four years of high school mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 131.

Note: There is a problem session offered for this course every Wednesday at the same time as the class is taught on Mondays. The problem session is optional, but it is highly recommended that a student keep this time free in her schedule so that she may attend the problem session. Students should register for this course as a first math course only if they have credit for Calculus I or placed into the course. This course does not fulfill the Sophia Program requirement in Mathematical Arts. However, students who have the equivalent of two semesters of AP calculus in high school with strong supporting test scores may be placed into MATH 132 Calculus II in consultation with the Math Placement Advisor. Students who are placed into MATH 132 Calculus II and earn a grade of C or higher are eligible to receive credit for MATH 131 Calculus I.

MATH 133  Theory and Application of Calculus  (4)  

This course is designed for students who have completed a full year of calculus in high school and have mastered the mechanics of differentiation and integration. The basic concepts of a two-semester college calculus sequence, including limits, derivatives, integrals, sequences and series, will be explored in depth. The emphasis of the course is on understanding the theory of calculus and constructing mathematical models. Prerequisite: A minimum score of 3 on the AP Calculus exam or permission of instructor.

This course is designed for students who have completed a full year of calculus in high school at the AP or equivalent level and have mastered the mechanics of differentiation and integration. Students who have taken the Math AP AB Exam should have a score of at least a 41. Students who have not taken the AP test should have two semesters of calculus at or above the AP level in high school and at least a 630 on the SAT or a 29 on the ACT. The basic concepts of calculus, including limits, derivatives, integrals, sequences, and series, will be explored in depth. The content of a full-year college- level calculus sequence is included in this one-semester course. The emphasis of the course is on understanding the theory of calculus and constructing mathematical models. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. It is typically followed by MATH 231 Calculus III. This course is offered only in the fall semester. Note: There is a problem session offered for this course every Wednesday at the same time as the class is taught on Mondays. The problem session is optional, but it is highly recommended that a student keep this time free in her schedule so that she may attend the problem session.


Elective Course Offerings Fall 2019

Dance

In addition to the dance courses listed on page 28, the following courses are available for elective credit. For both Sophia and elective dance courses, students receive two credit hours for technique courses taken for the first time and one credit hour for subsequent enrollment in the same level technique course. All two-credit technique courses include an academic component: required and recommended literary sources, as well as written midterm and final examinations that test knowledge of terminology and movement concepts.

DANC 243  Dance Ensemble Workshop (DEW)  (1-3)  

The ensemble functions as the student dance company in residence. The dancers meet on a regular basis for technique classes, master classes and rehearsals with faculty and guest choreographers. D.E.W. presents an annual concert. Variable credit offered for performance and production. Performance students must be concurrently enrolled in a technique class. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. By audition/permission only.

DANC 247  Classical Pointe Technique—Beginning/Intermediate  (1)  

A course for the intermediate level ballet student who wishes to explore an extension of ballet technique. Proper alignment and strength will be emphasized in building a strong point foundation. Corequisite: DANC 245. May be repeated for one credit.

Music

MUS 101  Class Piano - Beginners  (1)  

Beginning piano for those with no previous keyboard experience, using the electronic piano lab. Designed to develop music skills through correlation of music fundamentals with beginning piano literature, including folk songs, holiday songs, easy classics, and blues.

MUS 206  String Ensemble  (1)  

String Ensemble is a non-auditioned string (winds and percussion will be allowed when appropriate) ensemble open to all members of the college community. The course includes the study and performance of significant string literature. String Ensemble may be repeated for credit.

MUS 207  Concert Band  (1)  

Concert band is a nonauditioned instrumental ensemble open to all members of the college community. The course includes the study and performance of significant concert band literature. Concert Band may be repeated for credit more than once.

For information on additional ensembles at area colleges and universities, please call the Department of Music at (574) 284-4632.

For information on Class Guitar, Applied Music: Private Lessons and Choirs please see page 28.

Physical Education

The Physical Education Department offers selected activity courses based on student needs and interests. These courses are offered throughout the day and week to satisfy a broad range of fitness interests. You can de-stress with yoga or work on your core and flexibility with Pilates.

The High Intensity Training class (HIT) is a great option for students focused on a solid conditioning program. If you are drawn to cardio dance, WERQ is for you! This wildly addictive cardio dance class is based on the hottest pop and hip hop music. The workout is nonstop with repetitive athletic moves and fresh dance steps.

In response to popular fitness trends, we continue to offer spin and barre classes. Physical education classes and participation in intercollegiate athletics carry one-half semester hour of elective credit. One semester hour of credit may be applied to graduation. The following courses are available each semester:

PE 050PE Activity (Pilates).5
PE 050PE Activity (Yoga).5
PE 050PE Activity (WERQ).5
PE 050PE Activity (Spin).5
PE 050PE Activity (Barre).5
PE 050PE Activity (High Intensity Training HIT).5